Friday, April 22, 2005

A nice little strategy for making up ideas

I've been using this nice little strategy for making up ideas. There are three stages.

Stage one: finding an object for focus of creativity

I start with the directive:

Name an X-object

I will use the pangram trigger or directed-free-association to find the 'X'. In this case I choose 'red' and thus the directive reads:

Name a red object

I choose 'post box'.

Stage two: choosing an aspect of the object and cloning

I choose an aspect of a typical postbox and clone that aspect. I choose the slot (where the letter is posted). So I visualise a post box with hundreds of slots. (As explained in cloning aspects, I don't worry about functionality problems; in fact the new multi-slotted postbox concept could be treated as a lateral thinking provocation.)

Stage three: creating ideas

I use pre-listing to create ideas. This is done by creating X-versions of the post box slot. The directive is:

Create X-version of the post box slot.

Using pangram trigger, I create the random word 'call', resulting in:

call-version of post box slot

and consider what ideas this suggest.

This led to an interesting idea: 'a postbox you call with your mobile phone'. This would be useful for posting letters when you have no stamps: you would call a number on the postbox with your mobile and the slot would open when called. The postage costs would be paid for with the cost of the mobile call.

Further points

At the first stage - the 'name X object' stage I will try to list at least five objects from the directive. So 'red object' could lead to: post box, Liverpool shirt, post van, no-entry sign, my rubbish bin etc.

At stage two - the cloning aspects - I will sometimes pre-list again to choose what aspect to clone. The post box example could have led to:

Name X-aspect of post box

And, as an example:

pot-aspect of post box

could suggest that the basket inside the post box (where the letters rest) could be the aspect chosen for cloning.

At stage three - X-versions - I will always make sure I complete an idea and guarantee newness - even if the final idea is quite weak. This takes off the pressure to come up with a good idea every time. Quantity should lead to quality.

Another approach I use at stage three is to imagine that each of the cloned aspects has a sign above it with the random word as the title of the sign. So with the post box example, I would imagine a slot with a sign above it saying "Call slot". Then I have to think of a purpose or function that the sign suggests.

Thursday, April 21, 2005

Papal email address goes on sale

A journalism student from Dublin is hoping to sell an e-mail address for Pope Benedict XVI on eBay in a bid to slightly reduce his student loan.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/4466691.stm

Fifteen minutes of fame for the student. I'd like to set up a 'fifteen minutes of fame' blog/website where simple ideas like this are listed and people can adopt the ideas to bring their own fifteen minutes of fame.

Coming up with the ideas is the problem...how to think of clever, publicity-catching ideas that are topical. Perhaps the topicality is the hard part. When England lost to France in the European Championship I received an email along these lines:

An obscure rule in football states that England will be awarded a draw after their recent loss to France in the cup.

Scroll down...

...


...

Carlsburg don't do emails, but if they did they'd be the best emails in the world.

Saturday, April 16, 2005

Now-Here-Me-Doing and focus switching

Now-Here-Me-Doing

If I wanted to direct my attention to the present moment and my current activity etc I could list my 'Now-Here-Me-Doing'. My N-H-M-D for this moment is:

11.39am, Home, Me - John, Typing on the computer

Everyone else will have their own N-H-M-D and I could represent this as:

Then There Them Doing

As a foundation/template of this awareness I could list the possibilities of various N-H-M-Ds and T-T-T-D as:

Time Place Person(s) Activity

which I suppose is a way of stating a context. I could expand this expression of context to form a 'context line' thus:

Time Place Person(s) Activity Things Purposes Being (is) Having Saying Feeling Thinking

Focus of attention and Focus trap (?)

If I focus on the following idea:

Football clubs have 'cinemas' in London for London fans to watch their home games

then this idea is automatically the focus of attention.

If I were mind-mapping then this idea would be the centre of the mind-map. If I consider the branches of the mind-map, then each of the branches of the mind map could represent one of the aspects of the context line (Time Place Person(s) Activity Things Purposes Being (is) Having Saying Feeling Thinking). So I would have a mind-map with the idea at the centre and the eleven branches around it. Then I could switch the focus easily, so that one of the eleven branches would become the new pivot and the football idea would convert (be 'relegated')to being one of its branches.

If I were considering the football cinema idea then I could have been trapped in a context and thus my focus would also be 'trapped'. Considering the aspects of the context line as branches of a mind-map would help me to switch the focus to other areas.

A few ideas

I think London may be one of the biggest cities without a football club in its name. If one of the smaller clubs changed its name to 'London Utd/Town' they could guarantee themselves a future generation of fans.

There are many supporters of northern clubs (Liverpool, Man Utd etc) in London. I'm surprised these clubs don't start their own 'cinemas' in London where fans can go to see the home games live.

On a similar note I think someone could make a replica of the Cavern Club in London where tribute bands to the Beatles and other 60s group would play.

Friday, April 15, 2005

The pangram trigger for generating random words

About this post

Type of technique: random word generator

Post in a nutshell: pick two random letters and form words - starting with one syllable and then increasing the number of syllables.

Example: B & L = bell, balloon, bellicose, belligerent etc.


I use a pangram trigger to generate random words. My pangram of choice is:

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

I will choose two random letters from the pangram. Example:

A and C

I will begin by forming the shortest words possible from the letters, thus I will consider if there is a two letter word that can be formed and then if there are three letter words that can be formed. Next I consider words of one syllable, then proceed to words of two syllables and finally list the longest words I can think of triggered by the two letters. Throughout I try to list as many words as possible.

When I use the technique I will list the pangram twice on my pad of paper/PC with the words in various order. This helps me to avoid the habit of leaning towards certain areas - and thus letters - of the pangram as I start to 'get up to speed' creatively. Thus:

brown fox jumps over the lazy dog the quick
over the lazy dog the quick brown fox jumps

Then at the start of the next piece of paper I will change the order again:

dog the quick brown fox jumps over the lazy
fox jumps over the lazy dog the quick brown

Variation

Sometimes I will list the two letters in order: A C
and sometimes I will insert a space between the letters: A_C

as these two arrangements suggest different words (Ace and Arc, for example).

Thursday, April 07, 2005

'X-versions' for development of idea germs

The X-versions approach can develop, evolve and suggest alternative applications for existing idea germs.

There are four stages to using this approach.

With the following Global Ideas Bank idea as an example:

Lottery entry slips - tick box for 10% of winnings to charity

Stage 1

I will pretend there is a dictionary entry for the word and that the dictionary compilers have invented a word to describe the action of the idea. Thus:

10%ing: when a lottery has a tickbox indicating that the player agrees to ten percent of winnings being donated to charity

This is the IDEA.

Stage 2

I will state the following directive:

Creat an X-version of the IDEA

Stage 3

I will create the X-word. That is, I will create some short words that, as adjectives, will describe/modify the version of the idea. I create the X-words by listing the following pangram:

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dogs

and I will pick two letters at random and consider what words are triggered by these two letters. I aim to form words of just two or three letters (although if I cannot do this then I will try to form the shortest word possible).

Example:

C and T could trigger: cut, cat, cot

I choose 'cut'.

Stage 4

I will restate the directive, with the random word replacing the 'X'. Thus:

Create a cut-version of the IDEA

and I consider what variations are suggested by the directive.

Cut-version to me suggests that the player could choose the percentage that would be donated to charity instead of automatically agreeing to ten percent. Expressed as an idea:

Lottery players can choose a percentage of winnings that will be donated to charity.

More examples

I generated the following random words: final, sync, bit, chip, spot, do, age, act, chq and sad which led to these variations of the idea germ:

Final-version = the '10 percent to charity' idea would be done on one lottery draw only per year - perhaps at the end of the year or Christmas. In buying the ticket the player would automatically agree to the arrangement.

Sync-version = all the world's lotteries would carry out the tickbox idea to see the total that could be raised (perhaps this could be a once-per-year event).

Bit-version = the idea would only be implented online, for online purchasers of lottery tickets.

Chip-version = players of casino fruit machines (particularly fruit machines with substantial jackpots) could agree that ten percent of jackpot winnings would go to charity. (Perhaps there would be a special button on the fruit machines that is pressed to indicate the agreement.)

Spot-version = the lottery player 'spots' a cause and indicates on the lottery slip that the ten percent should go to that specific cause.

Do-version = a group of people could agree to defintely do (implement) the idea of their own initiative. The lottery organiser's website could have a place where players can register their names and agree that a percentage of winnings goes to charity.

Age-version = the lottery player's agreement on 'ten percent to charity' would 'last an age'. That is, they would register once and the agreement would stand for life.

Act-version = the big musicals could, in their first week, put a ten percent premium on ticket sales. Punters would be informed of this arrangement.

Chq-version = cheques could have a tickbox where the account holder agrees that ten percent (or perhaps a set amount of £1) of a transaction would be given to charity.

Sad-version = young people could agree to ten percent of their 'wealth' being donated to charity on the (unlikely) event of their death.

Further notes:

Following the precept that 'quantity leads to quality' it can be worth expressing the directive with the plural of 'versions'. Thus:

Create X-versions of the idea

This is also a reminder to 'look beyond the first idea'.

Sometimes I will adapt the dictionary definition to a broader concept level.

Example:

10%ing = when something has a tickbox agreeing to ten percent to charity

or

10%ing = when ten percent of a transaction goes to charity.

This helps to open up the idea germ to other possibilities.

Tuesday, April 05, 2005

My current thoughts on fiction

Here are my two current thoughts on fiction (as part of my ongoing formula for fiction project): the assumption of actual events and possession-illusion.

The assumption of actual events

I've recently realised I've been making a key assumption when considering stories: if I look at a film/story etc I assume that events I see on screen are the actual events - as they happened in chronological order. Maybe that actual film could have been a (dramatised) representation of what really happened? What really happened initially could have been fairly mundane and uninspiring - boring even. Maybe initially the writer could create the mundane events as a kind of template and then exaggerate events?

So, some process could occur that exaggerates the real events. At the moment I consider this could happen by retro-dream or interview-exaggeration.

Retro-dream

A retro-dream is when one of the characters from the story re-experiences the initial events in a subsequent dream but the dream inserts 'pockets of dramatisation' into the events. The writer can pick-off good retro-dream events to use in the final story.

Interview-exaggeration

One of the story's characters could have been interviewed after the events and exaggerated the actual events. So when a writer starts the creative process of writing a story they could start not by creating the story, but by creating the interview with the character. A sort of alternative entry-point for writing stories.

Possession-illusion

An individual (I'll call person A) could look at the events in a story for one character - the main character, a minor character or even an uninvolved bystander/witness. Person A would then create an 'inexorable line of events' that chronicles what happened to the chosen individual. Person A then picks a person at random (person B) and has to 'engineer reality' so that person B experiences the inexorable line of events.

Person A does this by possession. Person A can possess anyone except person B. So, if person A possesses all the people around person B (in whatever context or circumstances person B is in) he can make person B experience the inexorable line of events.

Person A can choose any character from the story to form the inexorable line of events and can choose any person as person B. He would choose many different people in many different contexts and also engineer reality so that the person experiences the events over different time periods. So Person A could set himself the challenge "make the paper boy experience the inexorable line of events in ten minutes".

My thoughts on this are that the sequence of events when A possesses B to experience the ILOE may trigger new ideas for inclusion in the final story.

Monday, April 04, 2005

Directed-association: a type of free-association

About this post:

Type of technique:
Free Association

The post in a nutshell: Write down a word, A. Then write down something associated with A to create word B. (This is done using a list of guide-words to help trigger an association.) Continue onwards from word B.


I have developed this directed free-association tool (directed-association) that is a variation of standard free-association.

(See Mycoted Free Association for a description of standard free-association)

This directed-association method serves four purposes:

1) To provide a list of words and concepts that can be used as an alternative to a dictionary when providing words for random stimulation

2) To suggest possible subjects for further creative effort

3) To uncover ‘forgotten’ ideas and discover ideas on the periphery of awareness

4) To warm up before a brainstorming session

I carry out this directed-association either on a sheet of A4 paper or on the PC.

The Start

At the start of the exercise I will form a list of people; these can be any people - including famous people, fictional characters and people I know. There are two ways to form this list of people.

1) Using the pangram:

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog

I will pick two letters at random and name someone with those initials.

2) I will select some random images on Google image search, and in any picture with people I will ask: “Who does this person remind me of?" or "who do they look like?”

Using these two methods I will make a list of about thirty people. The page of directed-association will now look like this:

People:

John Wayne, Mick Jagger, Ben Steele, Quincy Jones, Rocky Marciano, Nick Faldo, Forrest Gump, Julie Andrews, Jenny Hall, Sir Edmund Hillary, Judy Garland, Swiss Tony, Chris Patten, Snow White, Sir George Martin, Captain Caveman, Jenny Pitman, Dusty Springfield, Abominable Snowman, Nostradamus, Bill Oddie, Kiefer Sutherland, Barbara Cartland, Jasper Carrot, Terence Stamp, Dolph Lungren, Santa Claus, Buddha, Fay Wray, Joan of Arc

I will choose one of those people at random and this person (or that word) becomes the 'focus word'. (Eg John Wayne).

Guide-words

At the next stage – the main directed-association phase - I will list the following ten guide-words:

Has/Is/Does/Thing/Person/Time/Place/Activity/Specify/Utterance/^

and choose one to suggest an association for the focus word (in this example 'John Wayne'). I choose 'has', and the page now looks like:

People:

John Wayne, Mick Jagger, Ben Steele, Quincy Jones, Rocky Marciano, Nick Faldo, Forest Gump, Julie Andrews, Jenny Hall, Sir Edmund Hilary, Judy Garland, Swiss Tony, Chris Patten, Snow White, Sir George Martin, Captain Caveman, Jenny Pitman, Dusty Springfield, Abominable Snowman, Nostradamus, Bill Oddie, Keifer Sutherland, Barbara Cartland, Jasper Carrot, Terence Stamp, Dolph Lungren, Santa Claus, Buddha, Fay Wray, Joan of Arc

Has/Is/Does/Thing/Person/Time/Place/Activity/Specify/Utterance/^

John Wayne. (has)


Each of the ten guide-words can be expressed as a directive (to help reach the association)

Has: directive = “Name something that (focus word/concept) has”
Is: directive = “Name an adjective that describes (focus word/concept) ”
Does: directive = “Name something (focus word/concept) does”
Thing: directive = “Name something associated with (focus word/concept) ”
Person: directive = “Name a person associated with (focus word/concept) ”
Time: directive = “Name a time (or duration, era, event etc) associated with (focus word/concept) ”
Place: directive = “Name a place associated with (focus word/concept) ”
Activity: directive = “Name an activity associated with (focus word/concept)”
Specify: directive = “Specify/Name a(focus word/concept) ”
Utterance: directive = “Name an utterance (speech, quote etc) associated with (focus word/concept) ”
^: directive = “What IS (focus word/concept)? (step up to concept level)”.

With specify, if I have already named the person (eg John Wayne) this can lead me to consider if I’m thinking of THAT John Wayne or another person with the same name. Or I may consider if I'm thinking of a representation of John Wayne - such as a model or photo etc.

With ‘^’ I will step up to concept level. The concept level I use is dictionary concept level, where I consider a word/concept in the dictionary that represents this person. So with John Wayne it could be ‘actor’ ‘cowboy’ ‘legend’ or even ‘person’ etc.

Examples of possible associations for 'John Wayne' prompted by each guide-word:

Has: directive = “Name something that (John Wayne) has” GUN
Is: directive = “Name an adjective that describes (John Wayne ) ” MEAN
Does: directive = “Name something (John Wayne) does” ACT
Thing: directive = “Name something associated with (John Wayne) ” WESTERNS
Person: directive = “Name a person associated with (John Wayne) ” CLINT EASTWOOD
Time: directive = “Name a time (or duration, era etc) associated with (John Wayne) ” OSCARS NIGHT
Place: directive = “Name a place associated with (John Wayne) ” WILD WEST
Activity: directive = “Name an activity associated with (John Wayne)” HORSERIDING
Specify: directive = “Specify/Name a (John Wayne) ” THE ACTOR JOHN WAYNE
Utterance: directive = “Name an utterance (speech, quote etc) associated with (John Wayne) ” THE HELL I WILL
^: directive = “What IS (John Wayne)? (step up to concept level)” COWBOY

As I chose HAS as the guide-word, and the association I made was ‘gun’, my directed-association page now looks like:

People:

John Wayne, Mick Jagger, Ben Steele, Quincy Jones, Rocky Marciano, Nick Faldo, Forest Gump, Julie Andrews, Jenny Hall, Sir Edmund Hilary, Judy Garland, Swiss Tony, Chris Patten, Snow White, Sir George Martin, Captain Caveman, Jenny Pitman, Dusty Springfield, Abominable Snowman, Nostradamus, Bill Oddie, Keifer Sutherland, Barbara Cartland, Jasper Carrot, Terence Stamp, Dolph Lungren, Santa Claus, Buddha, Fay Wray, Joan of Arc

Has/Is/Does/Thing/Person/Time/Place/Activity/Specify/Utterance/^

John Wayne. (has) gun


Then, ‘GUN’ becomes the focus word/concept and once again I choose one of the guide-words to produce the next association.

So, if I choose ‘^’ then I will choose a dictionary-level concept that represents gun – ‘weapon’ for example. Resulting in my directed-association looking like this:

People:

John Wayne, Mick Jagger, Ben Steele, Quincy Jones, Rocky Marciano, Nick Faldo, Forest Gump, Julie Andrews, Jenny Hall, Sir Edmund Hilary, Judy Garland, Swiss Tony, Chris Patten, Snow White, Sir George Martin, Captain Caveman, Jenny Pitman, Dusty Springfield, Abominable Snowman, Nostradamus, Bill Oddie, Keifer Sutherland, Barbara Cartland, Jasper Carrot, Terence Stamp, Dolph Lungren, Santa Claus, Buddha, Fay Wray, Joan of Arc

Has/Is/Does/Thing/Person/Time/Place/Activity/Specify/Utterance/^

John Wayne. (has) gun. (^) weapon.


And ‘weapon’ becomes the focus word/concept

I will continue selecting guide-words and making associations until I have about half a page of words/concepts. Thus:

People:

John Wayne, Mick Jagger, Ben Steele, Quincy Jones, Rocky Marciano, Nick Faldo, Forest Gump, Julie Andrews, Jenny Hall, Sir Edmund Hilary, Judy Garland, Swiss Tony, Chris Patten, Snow White, Sir George Martin, Captain Caveman, Jenny Pitman, Dusty Springfield, Abominable Snowman, Nostradamus, Bill Oddie, Keifer Sutherland, Barbara Cartland, Jasper Carrot, Terence Stamp, Dolph Lungren, Santa Claus, Buddha, Fay Wray, Joan of Arc

Has/Is/Does/Thing/Person/Time/Place/Activity/Specify/Utterance/^

John Wayne. (has) gun. (^) weapon. (does) kill. (has) victim. (time) Bhopal. (is) disaster. (^) tragedy. (thing) grief. (utterance) good grief! (is) exclamation. (thing) surprise. (time) surprise party. (has) alcohol. (thing) drink driving. (is) illegal act. (specify) mugging. (is) upsetting. (time) funeral. (has) flowers. (specify) sunflower. (is) tall. (person) Robert Wadlow. (is) record breaker. (thing) Olympic games. (has) athlete (does) training. (specify) weightlifting. (is) strenuous. (thing) carrying suitcases. (does) tire. (time) late at night. (^) hour. (specify) witching hour. (thing) Halloween. (has) pumpkin. (activity) carving pumpkins. (has) knife. (^) cutlery. (is) sharp. (thing) razor. (does) shave. (utterance) ouch! (thing) ET. (^) character. (time) writing a story. (thing) writer’s block. (specify) songwriter’s block. (person) Sting. (utterance) walking on the moon. (specify) first moon landing. (utterance) one small step for man…(^) quotation. (person) Oscar Wilde. (utterance) either this wallpaper goes or I do. (^) humour (thing) Darwin awards. (^) award. (specify) Nobel prize. (has) prestige. (place) Lourdes. (has) miracles. (utterance) it’s a miracle!

One guide-word per line

On the second half of the paper I change tack slightly so that each line of the paper is dedicated to one guide-word:

Has
Is
Does
Thing
Person
Time
Place
Activity
Specify
Utterance
^

Starting with the ‘has’ line I will choose a word/concept at random from the body of directed-association ('writer's block', for example). I will answer the directive (in this case “Name something that (writer’s block) has”) and write the association on the 'has' line ('frustration'). Then I will pick another word/concept at random from the body of directed-association and find an association prompted by the guide-word. I will continue picking words/concepts at random and forming associations until I complete the ‘has’ line. I then proceed to the ‘is’ line etc, proceeding through all the guide-words until the page is full.

Has: (writer’s block) frustration. (quotation) humour. (pumpkin) roundness. (carrying suitcases) effort
Is: (Halloween) yearly. (knife) dangerous. (cutlery) metal. (athlete) fit. (killing) illegal. (Robert Wadlow) tall.
Does: (first moon landing) inspire. (Lourdes) attract pilgrims. (prestige) impress. (sunflower) grow
Thing: (funeral) vicar. (either this wallpaper goes or I do) humour. (Olympic games) torch. (humour) laughter
Person: (miracles) Virgin Mary. (tragedy) John F Kennedy Jr. (kill) Columbo. (illegal act) Robert Ressler
Time: (walking on the moon) 1969. (it’s a miracle!) winning the lottery (award) Oscars ceremony
Place: (carrying suitcases) airport. (flowers) florists. (ET) outer space. (ouch!) dentist's surgery
Activity: (Lourdes) prayer. (alcohol) suffering from hangover. (ouch!) regret. (knife) sharpening
Specify: (Lourdes) Madonna’s daughter. (sunflower) the one in my garden. (training) learning to drive
Utterance: (record breaker) YES! (victim) why does this happen to me? (yearly) Merry Christmas!

Final page:

People:

John Wayne, Mick Jagger, Ben Steele, Quincy Jones, Rocky Marciano, Nick Faldo, Forest Gump, Julie Andrews, Jenny Hall, Sir Edmund Hilary, Judy Garland, Swiss Tony, Chris Patten, Snow White, Sir George Martin, Captain Caveman, Jenny Pitman, Dusty Springfield, Abominable Snowman, Nostradamus, Bill Oddie, Keifer Sutherland, Barbara Cartland, Jasper Carrot, Terence Stamp, Dolph Lungren, Santa Claus, Buddha, Fay Wray, Joan of Arc

Has/Is/Does/Thing/Person/Time/Place/Activity/Specify/Utterance/^

John Wayne. (has) gun. (^) weapon. (does) killing (has) victim. (time) Bhopal. (is) disaster. (^) tragedy. (thing) grief. (utterance) good grief! (is) exclamation. (thing) surprise. (time) surprise party. (has) alcohol. (thing) drink driving. (is) illegal act. (specify) mugging. (is) upsetting. (time) funeral. (has) flowers. (specify) sunflower. (is) tall. (person) Robert Wadlow. (is) record breaker. (thing) Olympic games. (has) athlete (does) training. (specify) weightlifting. (is) strenuous. (thing) carrying suitcases. (does) tire. (time) late at night. (^) hour. (specify) witching hour. (thing) Halloween. (has) pumpkin. (activity) carving pumpkins. (has) knife. (^) cutlery. (is) sharp. (thing) razor. (does) shave. (utterance) ouch! (thing) ET. (^) character. (time) writing a story. (thing) writer’s block. (specify) songwriter’s block. (person) Sting. (utterance) walking on the moon. (specify) first moon landing. (utterance) one small step for man…(^) quotation. (person) Oscar Wilde. (utterance) either this wallpaper goes or I do. (^) humour (thing) Darwin awards. (^) award. (specify) Nobel prize. (has) prestige. (place) Lourdes. (has) miracles. (utterance) it’s a miracle!

Has: (writer’s block) frustration. (quotation) humour. (pumpkin) roundness. (carrying suitcases) effort
Is: (Halloween) yearly. (knife) dangerous. (cutlery) metal. (athlete) fit. (killing) illegal. (Robert Wadlow) tall.
Does: (first moon landing) inspire. (Lourdes) attract pilgrims. (prestige) impress. (sunflower) grow
Thing: (funeral) vicar. (either this wallpaper goes or I do) humour. (Olympic games) torch. (humour) laughter
Person: (miracles) Virgin Mary. (tragedy) John F Kennedy Jr. (kill) Columbo. (illegal act) Robert Ressler
Time: (walking on the moon) 1969. (it’s a miracle!) winning the lottery (award) Oscars ceremony
Place: (carrying suitcases) airport. (flowers) florists. (ET) outer space. (ouch!) dentist's surgery
Activity: (Lourdes) prayer. (alcohol) suffering from hangover. (ouch!) regret. (knife) sharpening
Specify: (Lourdes) Madonna’s daughter. (sunflower) the one in my garden. (training) learning to drive
Utterance: (record breaker) YES! (victim) why does this happen to me? (yearly) Merry Christmas!


Further point

I’ve found that naming people throughout the directed-association is a good tactic because a person – as a concept – is at a set level of specificity, and the mistake of listing concepts that are too abstract is avoided. Also the name of a person usually suggests a bundle of associations, activities, behaviour etc.

An example of directed-association results.