Saturday, August 12, 2006

A quick method for creating ideas

This method has four stages:

1) Find an object
2) Name a part of that object that exists in multiple form
3) Change a small number of those parts, or add a small number of new forms of that part
4) Use a random word to change those parts

Example

1) Find an object (using naming/listing).

For this example my object is: an ice-cube tray.

2) Name a part of that object that exists in multiple form.

There are many individual cube "cells" in an ice-cube tray.

3) Change a small number of those parts, or add a small number of new forms of that part.

I apply the changes to one, two or three of the parts. I'll focus on the existing parts of an ice-cube tray -- the cube cells -- and I'll opt to change three.

4) Use a random word to change those parts

This can take the format:

Three of the ice-cube cells are X cells

I can consider any immediate changes that are triggered , or I can use a random word to help create ideas. Initially, without a random word, I'm thinking that the cube cells could be rectangular. This would have benefits -- it would be easier to remove an ice cube from a rectangular cell as more leverage would be possible. But with the random words: device, queen and constant I get:

Three of the ice-cube cells are device cells.
Which could suggest that some of the cells could have a device that speeds the icing of the water.

Three of the ice-cube cells are queen cells.
Which suggest that three of the cells could be more important than all the others. Maybe they could be much bigger. Perhaps there could be an ice-cube tray that doesn't have any cells -- it would be just a rectangular box and you would have to break up the ice after freezing according to how much ice you need.

Three of the ice-cube cells are constant cells.
A means of keeping the cells at the same temperature -- even when the ice-cube tray is removed? There could be a device that wraps round the tray to keep the cubes frozen when you know you will need a few.

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