Sunday, October 21, 2007

Can you think of different "angles of attack" for this brainstorm?

I started the following Brainstorm on BrainReactions' Brainstorming Tool:

Can you think of different "angles of attack" for this brainstorm?

based on the brainstorm:

What would be a unique name for a new carwash business?

Obviously the initial approach is to directly make a suggestion for a name. But there are other approaches such as "consult a marketing expert" or "look at existing names for carwash businesses in Yellow Pages for inspiration".

Eventually I'm hoping that somehow I will be able to devise a system/strategy to generate many different ways to approach and solve any problem. Please let me know if you have any thoughts on how this could be done.





3 comments:

ranen said...

Hi John,

What is your USP? what does the brand stand for? what is the story of your brand? I suggest to try and find a solid, unique and interesting point - and then to find a great name.

John's Systematic Fiction and Creativity said...

Thanks ranen. I've been thinking about this problem for years and I've yet to get near to finding a solution. Finding different approaches to solving a problem can happen automatically if you're an experienced brainstormer or someone who's had lots of experience solving specific problems like the carwash-naming challenge, but I'd like to create a strategy that doesn't rely on experience: different angles-of-attack would be suggested by the strategy. The Apprentice Show's challenges are a good example of where people can overlook the simplest of options when they approach a challenge. Could there be a thinking-model that could be used to create an extensive array options for the participants? And would this thinking-model be useable in other areas? I have a few ideas I'll blog about soon but I have nothing concrete. Hopefully the BrainReactions challenge will list possible angles that I can use when trying to create this thinking-model/strategy.

ranen said...

I get your point. It is an interesting approach. I'll think about it and add my ideas on the Brainreactions challenge.